The Generation Game //  The geographer Dr Albert Sabater argues that the young and the old in the UK are living more physically separate lives – driven in part by the growing split between older homeowners and younger renters. He worries that this will accentuate what is seen as increasing antagonism between young and old, millennials and baby boomers, with the former accusing the latter of carving up society to suit them and leaving later generations only scraps.  In a report for the Guardian, myself and journalist Stephen Moss went to West Somerset and central Manchester – the parts of England with the oldest and youngest populations respectively – to test attitudes, see how different age groups in those areas related to each other, and investigate whether the notion of a war of the generations was true.   
       
     
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 The Generation Game //  The geographer Dr Albert Sabater argues that the young and the old in the UK are living more physically separate lives – driven in part by the growing split between older homeowners and younger renters. He worries that this will accentuate what is seen as increasing antagonism between young and old, millennials and baby boomers, with the former accusing the latter of carving up society to suit them and leaving later generations only scraps.  In a report for the Guardian, myself and journalist Stephen Moss went to West Somerset and central Manchester – the parts of England with the oldest and youngest populations respectively – to test attitudes, see how different age groups in those areas related to each other, and investigate whether the notion of a war of the generations was true.   
       
     

The Generation Game //

The geographer Dr Albert Sabater argues that the young and the old in the UK are living more physically separate lives – driven in part by the growing split between older homeowners and younger renters. He worries that this will accentuate what is seen as increasing antagonism between young and old, millennials and baby boomers, with the former accusing the latter of carving up society to suit them and leaving later generations only scraps.

In a report for the Guardian, myself and journalist Stephen Moss went to West Somerset and central Manchester – the parts of England with the oldest and youngest populations respectively – to test attitudes, see how different age groups in those areas related to each other, and investigate whether the notion of a war of the generations was true.

 

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03_SGG.jpg
       
     
06_SGG.jpg
       
     
05_SGG.jpg
       
     
04_SGG.jpg
       
     
07_SGG.jpg
       
     
12_SGG.jpg
       
     
09_SGG.jpg
       
     
11_SGG.jpg
       
     
10_SGG.jpg